≡ Menu

Top Ten iPhone Applications For 2009

Apple today released the iTunes Rewind 2009 a retrospective look at its top downloaded songs, podcasts, tv shows, movies, games and applications. I have summarised the corresponding top ten applications from the Australian and New Zealand iTunes store below.

top-downloaded-australian-apps-1-5

1. TomTom Australia – $99.99 – link

2. Mobile Maps Australia & New Zealand – $69.99 – link

3. Mobile Navigator Australia - $69.99 – link

4. Jamie Oliver’s 20 Minute Meals – $9.99 – link

5. Quickoffice Mobile Office Suite – $12.99 – link

top-downloaded-australian-apps-6-10

6. Tom Tom New Zealand – $114.99 (NZD) – link

7. Aussie Rules Live – FREE – link

8. ColorSplash – $2.49 – link

9. Quota – $2.49 – link

10. Optus Mobile Usage – $2.49 – link

The has been a massive demand for navigation applications this year, the top four out of six applications fit this category. However most interesting to me is that the Aussie Rules Live app is the only free application in the top ten download list; there is clearly a strong public appetite to pay for good apps.

Comments on this entry are closed.

  • http://www.rentoid.com/ steve sammartino

    This is a really strong insight here about pricing and relativity. I would never have expected the top iphone app to sell for $100. When we think of the category of iphone apps – we think of spending a few dollars, or more often free. But not $99 dollars. It's only when we assess the alternative of the $400 GPS versus the $99 application that the real value is unleashed.

    Pricing is never absolute, but relative to the benefits versus other options.

  • http://samsmojo.com Sam Granleese

    Hi Steve – you make a good point here. One of the big drawcards of a device like the iPhone is that it combines several gadgets into one. Consumers are price sensitive, but as you say, relative to other non-iphone-app options it has less effect. Hence why a $99 TomTom app can still be incredibly popular, even though it appears expensive compared to free ad-funded or >$10 productivity apps.

  • http://www.rentoid.com/ steve sammartino

    This is a really strong insight here about pricing and relativity. I would never have expected the top iphone app to sell for $100. When we think of the category of iphone apps – we think of spending a few dollars, or more often free. But not $99 dollars. It's only when we assess the alternative of the $400 GPS versus the $99 application that the real value is unleashed.

    Pricing is never absolute, but relative to the benefits versus other options.

  • http://samsmojo.com Sam Granleese

    Hi Steve – you make a good point here. One of the big drawcards of a device like the iPhone is that it combines several gadgets into one. Consumers are price sensitive, but as you say, relative to other non-iphone-app options it has less effect. Hence why a $99 TomTom app can still be incredibly popular, even though it appears expensive compared to free ad-funded or >$10 productivity apps.